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Bishop Police Dept. receives TxDot Grant

The City of Bishop Police Department has been awarded a grant from TxDot, marking the first time the police department has ever received funds from the state agency.

The TxDot Impaired Driving Mobilization Grant Award for the Bishop Police Department was accepted by council members during a Bishop City Council meeting held Wednesday, Sept. 29. Bishop Police Chief Edward Day said the department had applied for a Special TxDot STEP Grant, which stands for Special Traffic Enforcement Program. The total award is $8,000, which will be used as overtime revenue to put additional officers on the streets between 6 p.m. and 6 a.mm, in order to conduct DWI enforcement operations during high areas of the year such as New Year's Eve and Spring Break, Chief Day said. "We break it down to about 90 hours of overtime per period," Chief Day said, adding that TxDot refers to four specific periods throughout the year. Bishop has two zones that are targeted based on TxDot crash data on persons killed, Chief Day said. They are Hwy 77 and Business 77 and will be known as zones one and two, respectively. This is an 80/20 grant where TxDot pays 80 percent of overtime while the city pays 20 percent. "So for every $100 worked, they would reimburse $80 and we will cover $20," Chief Day told council members. "It won't be an increase to our budget, we'll use overtime funds already set aside for that." Chief Day said the TxDot Grant Award would pave the way for new funding possibilities.

"This is the first one. Now that we got our foot in the door, we're eligible for a lot more grant opportunities," Chief Day said.

members. "It won't be an increase to our budget, we'll use overtime funds already set aside for that."

Chief Day said the TxDot Grant Award would pave the way for new funding possibilities.

"This is the first one. Now that we got our foot in the door, we're eligible for a lot more grant opportunities," Chief Day said.


County issues proclamations; takes budget action

The Kleberg County Commissioners Court met in regular session on Monday afternoon, taking action on a number of items that included proclamations saluting county 4-H participants and the Purple Door Shelter as part of Domestic Violence Awareness month.

The meeting started with a proclamation being read by Commissioner David Rosse saluting all 4-H participants and the County Agriculture extension office for their efforts in keeping children involved in raising animals and agriculture. The students present at the meeting had their picture taken, then served donuts and cupcakes to the people in attendance.

Immediately following the 4-H proclamation, Commissioner Rosse read a proclamation citing the good efforts of the Purple Door Shelter as part of Domestic Violence Awareness month. Members of the Purple Door Shelter were in attendance and had their picture taken with the Commissioners after the proclamation was read.

The majority of the meeting, however, was spent on a couple of items involving the Historic Commission and funding for the Sheriff Department involving line-item expenditures.

Maggie Salinas gave a presentation to the board on the status of the Historical Commission. Salinas informed the Board that many of the off-

cers of the Commission have either moved out of either moved out of Kingsville or passed away during the last year. According to Salinas, there is no one authorized to sign checks and the county has to approve new members to the Historical Commission. Salinas said it was especially important to do so as quickly as possible as many of the offcial History of Kleberg County books that still remain are housed in the Conner Museum and have to be moved.

Commissioner Rosse asked Salinas if the county had paid for the books originally, and Salinas said "yes".

The board agreed to move the books and house them in a local school and would look into appointing new directors to the Historic Commission.

The board also heard an inquiry from the county auditor about the Sheriff's Department spending money out of the Deputy Sheriff salaries line item for other expenses. It is the policy of the county to not allow spending money out of that line item for anything other than salaries, and Sheriff Richard Kirkpatrick agreed to look into the expenditures and report back to the board.

Finally, the Board voted to mandate that all expenses due under the budget year that ended on September 30th be turned in by October 29 for final accounting purposes.


Grass roots movement seeks to end domestic violence locally

Domestic violence. The term often conveys images of a man hovering over a woman with a closed fist, the woman cowering on the floor, crying with hand outstretched as if to stop a coming blow. This isn't an accurate picture of what it really is. Oftentimes, it isn't physically violent but rather psychological in nature.

"Domestic violence is about power and control, not about anger," End Domestic Violence Task Force Leadership Board Member Jennifer Radcliffe-Jones said during a workshop, adding that it does not discriminate.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Month and serves to highlight a prevalent crime in the community. During the month of September, Kingsville Police Department received a total of 56 assault reports where at least 30 were considered family violence said Commander Bradley Lile during the workshop. "This is only about 1/5 of what is actually being reported," Lile added. "You don't realize how common it is."Domestic violence or family violence affects everyone. In the community, there are resources to help those who find themselves in similar situations, unfortunately, there are gaps that sometimes appear in the services that are offered, said Kathy Kimball, co-founder of the End Domestic Violence Task Force. "We want to fill the gaps that arise," Kimball said. "We want to help organizations that are already helping those in need." The End Domestic Violence Task Force is a grass roots movement of people from across the community who would like to see an end to domestic violence as well as to provide support for survivors, law enforcement, and advocates. Among the help provided by this organization is awareness and compassion. Many times, victims are ashamed to seek help, other times, they aren't aware that they are in an abusive relationship. The task force plans to educate area businesses, churches, and other establishments in order to create "Safe Places", Kimball said. A safe place is a place where a person would be able to seek resources. This is not a place for counseling but rather information. The End Domestic Violence Task Force meets every first Tuesday of the month at 6pm. Their next meeting will be Tuesday, Nov. 2 2021 at 6pm at 312 W. Kingsville. For more information, contact them by email at kleberg2dv@gmail.com or through their Facebook Page.


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